presents
Voter’s Edge California
Get the facts before you vote.
Voter’s Edge California
Go to top
Brought to you by
MapLight
League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
San Mateo County Libraries Voter Guide@SMCLibraries
June 5, 2018 — California Primary Election
Invest in unbiased information

With your support, we can reach and inform more voters.

Donate now to spread the word.

GovernorState of CaliforniaJune 5, 2018California Primary Election

June 5, 2018California Primary Election

State of CaliforniaGovernor

About this office

The highest elected official in California: Oversees most state departments and agencies. Prepares annual state budget. Approves or rejects new state laws.

Access additional information about this contest in the tabs in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

Who’s Running?

For this office, only the two candidates who get the most votes in the primary election advance to the general election. The two candidates may be from the same political party.
Candidates are randomly ordered based on how much information they have supplied. Learn more.
Please scroll down to see all candidates.
Democratic
COO, Justice Department
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • Changing the culture of politics - Getting money out of politics, prohibiting elected officials from running a business while in office, and addressing sexual misconduct in Sacramento
  • Housing - Declare a state of emergency around homelessness, pass the housing bond, and work with cities and localities to get federal funding and state assistance
  • Schools not prisons - Funding our education system and getting money our of private prisons
Profession:COO, Justice Department
Chief of Operations, California Department of Justice — Appointed position (20172018)
National Political Director, Hillary for America (20152016)
Candidate - CA Congressional District 21, Self (20132014)
Chief of Staff/Legislative Director/Economic Policy Adviser, U.S. Senate (20052013)
Harvard University Master of business administration, Business (2003)
Stanford University Bachelor of arts, Economics; Political Science (1997)

Government works best when inspiring public servants do the people’s business with humility, enthusiasm, and skill. From Washington to Sacramento, we run into problems when politicians are allowed to buy their way into office and use their power for personal benefit. In order to run for office, I recently stepped down from the senior team at the California Department of Justice. As the DOJ’s Chief of Operations, I led a team of 1,000 dedicated public servants and managed an $850 million budget. The DOJ has locked up human traffickers, cracked down on polluters, protected immigrants’ rights, fought for women’s healthcare, shielded seniors from Medi-Cal fraud, and secured millions in student refunds from shady for-profit colleges. Prior to the DOJ, I was a math teacher in the Central Valley, a budget analyst for the City of San Jose, an economic policy adviser to Senator Feinstein, the first Latina Chief of Staff in US Senate history, and the National Political Director for a Presidential campaign. This gives me the deepest policy experience in the race, but mostly it shows that I’ve treated public service as a lifelong calling. Californians take pride in being on the frontiers of change in America. That’s why we can’t sit back any longer. We need fresh faces and new ideas this year. It’s time to shake things up. Learn more about our movement at www.amandarenteria.com.

1.
Question 1

There is a shortage of affordable housing in California. How would you approach addressing California’s housing crisis? Please include specific proposals.

Answer from Amanda Renteria:

Housing is one of the greatest challenges facing our state, and we must have every tool on the table. Having lived in all parts of our state, I also understand that there isn't any one-size-fits-all solution, as what works for San Francisco, won't be what works for the Central Valley, which won't be what works for L.A.

As governor I would also:

- Declare homelessness a State of Emergency in our hardest-hit cities in order to unlock new tools for immediately addressing homelessness

- Appoint a Housing Specialist that directly reports to the governor to establish a long-term housing plan - Expand tax credits and housing assistance for low-income and middle-class families

- Partner with cities and counties to solicit federal funds for housing development

2.
Question 2

California has some of the richest people in the country and some of the poorest. What would you do to reduce income inequality in California?

Answer from Amanda Renteria:

While there are many policies that California should enact to reduce the dangerous levels of income inequality and poverty, my top three priorities would be to:

  1. Declare a State of Emergency on Homelessness and call for City Housing Plans across the state. We need every possible tool to combat the growing number of families on our streets. I will work with mayors, city councils, and housing experts on combating homelessness in the short term and creating long-term planning for a sustainable solution going forward.

 

  1. Adopt single-payer, universal health coverage for every Californian. Our state should pave the way for single-payer, universal health coverage nationwide, ensuring that every Californian has coverage, driving down health care costs to levels comparable to every other advanced country in the world, and dramatically improving health outcomes.

  1. Enact into state law President Obama’s overtime wage protections that have been undermined under Trump. Until President Obama’s update to the U.S. Department of Labor’s overtime wage protections, workers lost ground for decades as fewer and fewer were covered by overtime rules. California should put in place the Obama overtime regulations that President Trump has undermined and ensure the salary and compensation levels are updated automatically in order to maintain their value over time.  

3.
Question 3

Currently there isn't enough money in the state retirement system to pay for all the benefits promised to government workers. What would you do as Governor to address the state’s unfunded pension liability?

Answer from Amanda Renteria:

Public sector workers deserve a secure pension that rewards their selfless public service. For too long, however, politicians have not made the contributions that they were required to in order to fully fund public retirement systems. It is critical that the state and local governments make their annual required contributions to pension funds so that the percentage of unfunded liabilities does not increase further. To ensure that state and local governments are contributing enough, I will work to review the assumed rate of return on pension assets to ensure that current expectations are realistic.

 

For the private sector, we need to ensure a strong implementation of CalSavers. Particularly, we need to ensure that California uses its huge negotiating power to lower fees down to levels comparable to the federal Thrift Savings Plan (TSP). Investment options should also be very simple, with target-date funds with the most appropriate mix of assets based on expected retirement dates.

4.
Question 4

How would you describe your feelings about charter schools? Are you in favor of any changes in the way the state governs charter schools?

Answer from Amanda Renteria:

It is critical that we hold charter schools accountable. I support requiring charter schools to protect against conflicts of interest and ensure good governance requirements. That includes increased fiscal monitoring of charter schools.

5.
Question 5

California and the federal government have disagreed about enforcement of immigration laws. Do you support California’s current ‘Sanctuary State’ law? If not, why not? Are there additional strategies that you would pursue as Governor?

Answer from Amanda Renteria:

I strongly support the package of bills recently enacted into law, including the Support Immigrant Worker Protection Act. Unfortunately, the Trump Administration is now waging an all-out attack against California’s efforts to protect its residents. As Governor, I would vigorously defend the State both in court and in the public. I would also continue to ensure that no state resources are used to help the federal government enforce unjust immigration laws. As the former Chief of Operations at California’s Justice Department, I know the importance of working with the Attorney General to ensure the Department has the resources it needs going forward.

 

I also strongly believe that every individual and family in California who are threatened by the enforcement of unjust immigration laws have access to immigration attorneys who will defend their rights. My administration will also increase social service supports to immigrants who face unprecedented threats from federal authorities. For example, the constant fear of deportation and the splitting up of families is damaging the health and well-being of immigrant communities. It is particularly urgent that we help children with the daily trauma that they are experiencing. Finally, California must continue to educate immigrants and their allies of their rights to resist federal immigration authorities.

Total money raised: $100,824

Top contributors that gave money to support the candidate, by organization:

1
Phibro Animal Health Corporation
$29,200
2
Crowdpac
$22,500
3
Friends of Renteria
$15,480
4
Collegium Pharmacetical, Inc.
$2,500
4
Disney
$2,500

By State:

California 39.86%
New Jersey 30.08%
Washington 17.96%
Massachusetts 2.99%
Other 9.12%
39.86%30.08%17.96%9.12%

By Size:

Large contributions (97.92%)
Small contributions (2.08%)
97.92%

By Type:

From organizations (15.68%)
From individuals (84.32%)
15.68%84.32%
Source: MapLight analysis of data from the California Secretary of State.

Californians have always taken pride in being on the frontiers of change, but the 2018 campaign cycle is shaping up to be truly unprecedented. From Virginia to Oklahoma, we’ve already seen a stunning wave of new energy sweep away longstanding patterns of electoral outcomes. Women, minorities, and young people are newly empowered and hungering for fresh faces. They’re demanding a new generation of more ethical leaders, and they won’t settle for anything less.

Amanda is the right candidate at the right time. Over nearly two decades, she has treated public service as a lifelong calling. She has proven that she is a dedicated public servant who is sincerely motivated to help others. Without exception, she has been a role model and inspiration to others.

From economics, to healthcare, to agriculture, she also has the broadest and deepest policy expertise of any candidate in the race. Crafting and negotiating effective policy for the world’s sixth largest economy is technically complex and involves diverse stakeholders. Californians will prefer a serious policymaker who has succeeded at the national level.

Meanwhile, campaigning has fundamentally changed in the last few years, primarily due to the rise of social media. While a candidate still needs resources to compete, the time and expense needed to win can be drastically lower for a candidate who understands and embraces the new reality. The new approach to campaigning is especially well suited to the newly empowered voting populations that are most naturally attracted to the Renteria campaign. 

As Governor, Amanda Renteria will make politics about people again, and inspire a new generation.

— May 1, 2018 Renteria for Governor

I believe that every Californian has a right to:

  • Elected leaders who work only for the people
  • Safety in our homes, workplaces, and communities (including freedom from harassment and discrimination)
  • Clean air and water, no matter where we live
  • Safe and affordable housing
  • Quality, affordable health care
  • An education that prepares every child for the 21st century economy

 

— May 1, 2018 Renteria for Governor

Amanda's background including her time as Chief of Operations for the CA Department of Justice and Chief of Staff in the United States Senate.

No Party Preference
Senior Software Engineer
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • From the moment of conception until natural death, every human being is entitled to protections under the law, to just treatment and to equitable consideration.
  • Support economic policies that expand opportunities for the poor, and rebuilding and supporting a vibrant middle class, the erosion of which is a fundamental threat to our democracy.
  • Work to fix the ecological deficits of the past, act as responsible managers in the present, and ensure for future generations a planet that is healthy and thriving.
Profession:senior software engineer
Lead Software Engineer, iCrossing (20082009)
Senior Software Engineer, YellowPages.com (20042008)
Senior Software Engineer, Los Angeles Times (20082008)
Intermediate Software Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratories (JPL) via Northrup Grumman IT (20012003)
Software Engineer, GE Harris Harmon Control and Information Systems (19992001)
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Bachelor of Science, Computer Science (1999)
National Committee, American Solidarity Party (2016current)
Den Leader, Boy Scouts of America (20122013)
CCD Teacher, St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church (20022003)
  • Dr. James Hanink, contributing editor to the New Oxford Review and President of the American Maritain Association
  • Joe Schriner, journalist, activist, and six-time independent presidential candidate
1.
Question 1

There is a shortage of affordable housing in California. How would you approach addressing California’s housing crisis? Please include specific proposals.

Answer from Desmond Silveira:

The greatest housing shortages in the state exist in locations that have rent control.  Though this is a local decision, as it should be, it greatly exacerbates the problem of housing availablity in the communities that adopt it.  At the state level, I would work toward making housing more affordable by encouraging more housing developments, thus increasing the supply, and decreasing the market rate.

2.
Question 2

California has some of the richest people in the country and some of the poorest. What would you do to reduce income inequality in California?

No answer provided.
3.
Question 3

Currently there isn't enough money in the state retirement system to pay for all the benefits promised to government workers. What would you do as Governor to address the state’s unfunded pension liability?

No answer provided.
4.
Question 4

How would you describe your feelings about charter schools? Are you in favor of any changes in the way the state governs charter schools?

Answer from Desmond Silveira:

I support the right of families to choose the best methods for educating their children, be they public, charter, private, parochial or home-based education.

5.
Question 5

California and the federal government have disagreed about enforcement of immigration laws. Do you support California’s current ‘Sanctuary State’ law? If not, why not? Are there additional strategies that you would pursue as Governor?

Answer from Desmond Silveira:

I support a generous policy of welcoming immigrants fleeing persecution and violent conflict within their countries of origin, including a call for the United States to fulfill its obligations under international law in regards to the treatment of refugees and those fleeing inhumane conditions.  I support providing safety and opportunity for all immigrants who currently reside within California, including equal access to driving privileges and higher education.

I support the santuarty state status of California, because the state and local governments have the right to make their own decisions in regard to resource expenditure when it comes to immigration enforcement.  It doesn't make sense for the state to spend the level of resources that the federal government requests of us, especially when immigrants are being unfairly blamed as a scapegoat for society's problems.  However, though I think it's economically unwise, I do fully support the rights of local governments to opt out of the santuary status.

Democratic
Educator/Youth Advocate
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • Invest in education, cradle through career.This means:prenatal care,paid maternity & paternity leave,affordable childcare and universal preschool,move CA to the top 10 in per pupil spending for K-12,build more colleges,make college tuition free again
  • Housing for the homeless & affordable housing for ALL: emergency moratorium on large rent increases and no cause evictions; rapid re-housing for our homeless and build one million affordable homes in eight years with a concentration near transit hubs
  • Improve the health and safety of all Californians: pass SB562 - universal healthcare; combat climate change and provide clean air and water for all, criminal justice reform and gun violence protection.
Profession:Youth Advocate, Educator, Policy Advisor
Speaker, Consultant on Education and Public Policy, Self (20082016)
Executive Director, National Institute of Educational Leadership, Washington, D.C. (20032005)
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, California State Government — Elected position (19952003)
State Assemblywoman, California State Legislature — Elected position (19861994)
Account Manager, then Corporate Planner, Pacific Telesis Group, San Francisco (19791986)
City Councilwoman, Union City City Council — Elected position (19801986)
Professor of Political Science, Ventura College, De Anza College, Cañada College (19721979)
Professor of Political Science,, DeAnza College, Cupertino (19731979)
Golden Gate University Honorary Doctorate, Humane Letters (1999)
California State University Honorary Bachelor of Arts and Sciences, Lifelong Learning (1998)
University of California, Santa Barbara Masters, Political Science (1971)
University of California, Davis Bachelors Degree, Political Science (1969)
Carlmont High School, Belmont, CA High School Diploma, General (1965)
  • California Conference of Machinists and Aerospace Workers
  • Richard Whitmore, Trustee, Acalanes Union High School District; former Superintendent, Los Gatos Unified
  • Shelton Yip, Board Member, Yolo County Office of Education
  • Laura Chick, former CA Inspector General, LA Controller, LA City Council
  • Harry Britt, former San Francisco Supervisor
  • Tom Ammiano, former State Assemblymember and San Francisco Supervisor
  • Michael Katz, Former San Leandro School Board President
  • Nancy Hsieh, former Trustee, San Mateo-Foster City School Board
  • Bill Harrison, former Mayor, Fremont
  • Susan Hammer, former Mayor, San Jose
  • Linda Fernandes, former New Haven Unified Joint Board Member
  • Ann Evans, former Mayor, Davis
  • Carol Dutra-Vernaci, Mayor, Union City
  • Emily Duncan, Vice Mayor Union City
  • Ann Crosbie, President, Fremont Unified School District Board
  • Sarabjit Cheema, Board Member, New Haven Unified School Board
  • Jennifer Cavenaugh, Councilmember, Piedmont
  • Stephen Cassidy, former Mayor of San Leandro
  • Ronnie Caplane, fmr Piedmont School Board Trustee; fmr Chair, Dept. Ind.Rltns.
  • Linda Canlas, Board President, New Haven Unified School District
  • Desrie Campbell, Trustee, Fremont Unified School District
  • Teri Burns, Trustee, Natomas Unified School District
  • Mike Bucci, Vice Mayor, Newark
  • Harry Britt, former Supervisor, San Francisco
  • Chelsea Bonini, former Pres.,San Mateo-Foster City School District
  • Sam Blanco III, former Woodland Joint Unified School Board President
  • Barbara Archer, Board President, Davis Joint Unified School District
  • Austin Allison, Councilmember, Eureka
  • Sheila Allen, FN, PhD, Former Davis School Board member
  • Cathy Northington, Calaveras County Superintendent
  • James Brescia, San Luis Obispo County Superintendent
  • Ken Berrick, Trustee, Alameda County Board of Education
  • Stacy Adler, Mono County Superintendent
  • Richard Valle, Alameda County Supervisor
  • Jim Provenza, Yolo County Supervisor
  • Jane Parker, Monterey County Supervisor
  • Dave Cortese, Santa Clara County Supervisor
  • Mary Adams, Monterey County Supervisor
  • Sally Tanner, former Assemblywoman (Riverside)
  • Virginia Strom-Martin, former Assemblywoman (Marin)
  • Lori Saldana, former Assemblywoman (San Diego)
  • Leona Egeland Rice, former Assemblywoman (Santa Clara)
  • Joan Buchanan, former Assemblywoman (Alamo)
  • Loni Hancock, former State Senator (Berkeley)
  • Amber Childress, Trustee, Alameda County Board of Education
  • Bill Cirone, former Santa Barbara County Superintendent
  • Michael West, Colusa County Superintendent
  • Dr. Patrick Traynor, Alpine County Superintendent
  • Dr. Amy Slavensky, Amador County Superintendent
  • Francisco Reveles, Yuba County Superintendent
  • Jesse Ortiz, Yolo County Superintendent
  • Terry Oestreich, Plumas County Superintendent
  • Marilyn Nemzer, Trustee, Marin County Board of Education
  • Don Saylor, Yolo County Supervisor
  • Brock Falkenberg, Lake County Superintendent
  • Robin Harper, Mariposa County Superintendent
  • Krystal Lomanto, San Benito County Superintendent
  • Eileen McDonald, Trustee, Alameda County Board of Education
  • Barbara Nemko, Napa County Superintendent
  • Dr. Lisa Fontana, Inyo County Superintendent
  • Dede Alpert, former State Senator (San Diego)
  • Anne Schneider, City Councilmember, Davis
  • Rochelle Swanson, City Councilmember, Davis
  • Eddie Tejada, Redlands City Councilman
  • Rosie Tejada, Trustee, Jefferson Union HIgh School District
  • Km Trutane, Trustee, Albany Unified School District
  • Judy Turner, Chair, Tehema County Democratic Party
  • Annette Walker, Member, Hayward School Board, Professor
  • Rosemary Wrenn, Chair, San Luis Obispo County Democratic Party
  • John T. Selawsky, Chair, Rent Stabiization Board, Berkeley
  • Tom Torlakson, State Superintendent of Public Instruction
  • Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, Assemblywoman (Winters)
  • San Bernardino County Young Democrats
  • Ventura County Young Democrats
  • San Francisco Berniecrats
  • Feel the Bern Democratic Club of Los Angeles
  • San Francisco Bay Guardian
  • National Women's Political Caucus
  • Karen Humphrey, former Mayor, Fresno
  • Heather Fargo, former Mayor, Sacramento
  • Victor Aguilar, San Leandro School Board Trustee
  • Norma Acala, President, Washington Unified School District
  • Yolo County Progressives
  • Women Democrats of Sacramento County
  • Tri-Valley Democratic Club
  • Stanislaus County for Bernie 2020
  • Santa Cruz County for Bernie Sanders
  • San Mateo Our Revolution
  • San Francisco Richmond Democratic Club
  • San Diego Progressive Democratic Club
  • Rural Caucus, CA Young Democrats
  • Progressive Caucus, CA Young Democrats
  • Our Revolution, Ventura County
  • Our Revolution, Lake County
  • Our Revolution, Gold Coast
  • Our Revolution, Conejo Valley
  • NorCal4OurRevolution
  • National Women’s Political Caucus, California
  • Mendocino Women’s Political Coalition
  • Inland Empire Region, CA Young Democrats
  • San Francisco Harvey Milk LGBT Democratic Club
  • F.U.N. Progressives (Fremont-Union City-Newark)
  • Environmental Caucus, CA Young Democrats
  • East Bay Women’s Political Alliance
  • Democratic Women of Monterey County
  • Democrats of Mira Costa College
  • Cal Dems (UC Berkeley)
  • Bayshore Progressives
  • California Democratic Legislative Women’s Caucus
  • University Professional and Technical Employees, CWA Local 9119, AFL-CIO
  • Associated Administrators of Los Angeles
  • Chicano Latino Caucus of San Bernardino County
  • Feminist Majority
  • East Bay Our Revolution
  • International Longshore and Warehouse Union SCDC
  • Evolve California
1.
Question 1

There is a shortage of affordable housing in California. How would you approach addressing California’s housing crisis? Please include specific proposals.

Answer from Delaine Eastin:

 

California has the largest number and percentage of homeless individuals in the nation. We have the lowest percentage of homeowners of any state in the country. We have the oldest children living at home with their parents. Roughly 33% of renters spend half their income on housing. Not only is this costing our economy billions, Delaine understands that it is just plain wrong to force so many families into poverty when it is a fixable solution. We must:

1.   Housing for the homeless & affordable housing for ALL. Inequality is growing, with one in four children living in poverty. Our high poverty rate is partially caused by the high cost of housing in California. It will take years for us to build our way out of this situation, which means we need to take immediate steps to curb the loss of our current affordable housing stock while we look to build a million or more affordable  units in eight years.

a.    Emergency moratorium on large rent increases and no cause evictions -- Repeal Costa Hawkins and implement emergency legislation to restrict rent increases and condominium conversions while we deal with the severe housing shortage. We cannot afford to let the problem get worse while we seek long term solutions.

b.    Rapid re-housing for our homeless -- Our homeless crisis affects us all. From deadly outbreaks of hepatitis to massive increases in sexual assault, child abuse and domestic violence, the situation is dire and needs focused coordination between agencies so that people can secure shelter while we build our way out of this crisis. This includes a large expansion of housing vouchers, eliminating housing discrimination, and using hotels, motels, tiny houses and cooperative housing to help people get immediate shelter.

 

c.     Build one million affordable homes in five years with a concentration near transit hubs -- We need a statewide housing plan that links housing, jobs and transit with both carrots and sticks to ensure implementation. Cities that haven’t met their obligations to provide workforce housing should be forced to supplement the costs for transit in the short run, to improve mass transit accessibility, and to expand affordable workforce housing for people who work in that community

2.
Question 2

California has some of the richest people in the country and some of the poorest. What would you do to reduce income inequality in California?

Answer from Delaine Eastin:

 

 There used to be an old adage, an honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay (at least if you were a white male.) When Delaine was young, 30% of the country was unionized, including her own as her father was a machinist, and the middle class thrived. Over the past several decades, productivity has skyrocketed and corporations have made billions, but more and more is being hoarded at the top as union membership has fallen to historic lows. Today, only 10% of the country is in a union, and Janus vs. AFSME threatens to lower this even further.

Over the decades, workers have seen reduced or stagnated compensation, all while living costs such as housing, healthcare, childcare and education have skyrocketed. This is unsustainable. California must have a full court press on the issues of income inequality.

This means working to lift wages, pay equity for women, helping families secure affordable housing, childcare and preschool that doesn’t cost the same as a mortgage, healthcare for all, providing excellent k-12 education and free college tuition again.

Whether you’re a machinist in Modesto, a teacher in Tulare, a laborer in Los Angeles or a techie in Silicon Valley, California needs to be a place where you can buy a home, send your kids to college, and live a comfortable retirement. 

 

3.
Question 3

Currently there isn't enough money in the state retirement system to pay for all the benefits promised to government workers. What would you do as Governor to address the state’s unfunded pension liability?

Answer from Delaine Eastin:

 

There used to be an old adage, an honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay (at least if you were a white male.) When Delaine was young, 30% of the country was unionized, including her own as her father was a machinist, and the middle class thrived. Over the past several decades, productivity has skyrocketed and corporations have made billions, but more and more is being hoarded at the top as union membership has fallen to historic lows. Today, only 10% of the country is in a union, and Janus vs. AFSME threatens to lower this even further.

Over the decades, workers have seen reduced or stagnated compensation, all while living costs such as housing, healthcare, childcare and education have skyrocketed. This is unsustainable. California must have a full court press on the issues of income inequality.

This means working to lift wages, pay equity for women, helping families secure affordable housing, childcare and preschool that doesn’t cost the same as a mortgage, healthcare for all, providing excellent k-12 education and free college tuition again.

Whether you’re a machinist in Modesto, a teacher in Tulare, a laborer in Los Angeles or a techie in Silicon Valley, California needs to be a place where you can buy a home, send your kids to college, and live a comfortable retirement. 

4.
Question 4

How would you describe your feelings about charter schools? Are you in favor of any changes in the way the state governs charter schools?

Answer from Delaine Eastin:

Last year I joined the NAACP in calling for a moratorium, and I am the only candidate that I know to do so. I am also not taking charter school developer or charter school PAC money (I am also the only candidate not taking corporate money). Here is the article: https://medium.com/@delaineeastin_13262/california-needs-a-moratorium-on-charter-schools-b9bab2f44add

 

When I was in the Assembly I authored one of the first charter school bills as charters were being proposed. My bill had more oversight, including requiring teachers to be credentialed and greater accountability.  Unfortunately, the Republican governor signed a colleague’s bill which had little accountability and is in part responsible for the problems we have today. Some charters cherry pick high achievers and do not accept special needs students, while others find excuses to expel or turn away low achieving children. Because of lax accounting requirements, some charters have redirected taxpayer dollars to charters that are not following the auditing standards regular public schools are held to. The fact that one-third have gone out of business is telling. We must have a moratorium on new charter schools and tighten up the oversight and ensure they are not allowed to buy public lands or public buildings, buy the principal a convertible, as did happen, or to charge children from another country $30,000 a year to attend a charter high school while guaranteeing the families there would be guaranteed admission to UC Berkeley upon graduation, as happened in Livermore.

 

 

5.
Question 5

California and the federal government have disagreed about enforcement of immigration laws. Do you support California’s current ‘Sanctuary State’ law? If not, why not? Are there additional strategies that you would pursue as Governor?

Answer from Delaine Eastin:

"Our Dreamers and our DACA Californians are as American as I am. And I am proud California became a sanctuary state." Delaine Eastin

Delaine's father was born in Kentucky and he was fond of saying that "Californians are people born somewhere else who came to their senses." In 2015, the most current year of data, 27% of California's population was indeed, born somewhere else. California is home to more than 10 million immigrants with half of California’s children having at least one immigrant parent.

California is the second most diverse state in the country, and Delaine considers it our greatest strength. Immigrants are the most entrepreneurial people in our country. They dream and do and sacrifice to give their children the American dream. 

Delaine strongly supports California’s status as a Sanctuary State. She believes we must provide a path to citizenship for DACA recipients that includes granting protected status to their parents, and that the very idea that the government would betray these amazing young people by targeting their parents is anti-American. Family is everything.

Regarding workplaces, our state Attorney General has said the state will fine any business that voluntarily cooperates with ICE. As Governor, Delaine would certainly support this to make sure that our undocumented (and documented) workers are protected from the predatory behaviors we have witnessed the federal government take.

Under the Constitution, state and local governments have every right to refuse to help enforce federal law. In cases like Printz v. United States (1997) and New York v. United States (1992), the Supreme Court has ruled that the Tenth Amendment forbids federal “commandeering” of state governments to help enforce federal law. Most of the support for this anti-commandeering principle came from conservative justices such as the late Antonin Scalia, who wrote the majority opinion in Printz.

Few if any federal grants to state and local governments are conditioned on cooperation with federal deportation efforts. The Supreme Court has long ruled that conditions on federal grants to state and local governments are not enforceable unless they are “unambiguously” stated in the text of the law “so that the States can knowingly decide whether or not to accept those funds.”

Throughout Delaine's career she has stood up for all Californians to live with dignity and to be treated with respect. As State Superintendent she stood strong against Governor Pete Wilson after the passage of Prop 187. He ordered Delaine to have teachers act as immigration agents. When Delaine said no he threatened to have her recalled. She joined the lawsuit against Prop 187 and they won. Delaine also opposed Propositions 209 and 227. In her race to serve a second term as Superintendent, she was specifically attacked for being a strong supporter of bilingual education.

Total money raised: $931,125

Top contributors that gave money to support the candidate, by organization:

1
EASTIN, DELAINE
$100,449
2
Ponderosa Homes
$15,250
3
University of California, Davis
$11,591
4
Bank of America
$9,053
5
Neo Philanthropy
$8,250

By State:

California 92.46%
Massachusetts 3.47%
Delaware 1.04%
Washington 0.86%
Other 2.18%
92.46%

By Size:

Large contributions (93.76%)
Small contributions (6.24%)
93.76%

By Type:

From organizations (4.01%)
From individuals (95.99%)
95.99%
Source: MapLight analysis of data from the California Secretary of State.
— April 17, 2018 Campaign

Meet Delaine in this one minute video and hear why she is running to be California's next governor!

— April 17, 2018 Campaign (video clip)

A clip from a debate where Delaine states her position that we must reduce prescription drug prices (Delaine takes no money from any corporations, including drug companies)

Libertarian
Entrepreneur/Transhumanist Lecturer
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • Provide a universal basic income via monetizing unused federal land (not raising taxes)
  • Decriminalizing all drugs and ending the war on drugs
  • Lowering taxes dramatically across the state
Profession:Entrepreneur & Libertarian Futurist
Self employed Entrepreneur real estate & Transhumanist Lecturer, Zoltan Istvan (2010current)
2016 Transhumanist Party Presidential nominee, Transhumanist Party — Elected position (20152016)
Columbia University Bachelor of Arts, Philosophy and Religion (current)
Advisor, Transhumanist Party (2016current)

Zoltan Istvan is often considered the world’s leading transhumanist and a top Libertarian futurist. Zoltan began his futurist career by publishing The Transhumanist Wageran award-winning, #1 bestseller in Science Fiction and Philosophy. The libertarian-minded novel has been compared to Ayn Rand’s work many times in major media and was a Top 5 Amazon book. During the 2016 elections, Zoltan interviewed with Gary Johnson to potentially be his preferred Vice Presidential running mate. Zoltan is also a well known technology journalist and a former filmmaker for the National Geographic Channel. As a successful entrepreneur, The New Yorker cited Zoltan made a "small real estate fortune." Zoltan also has executive experience via his former position as a director at a major wildlife nonprofit, WildAid. In total, Zoltan’s public work has received hundreds of millions of views, much of it through his political activism. He is running for California Governor for the Libertarian Party in 2018. Zoltan has spoken at the World Bank, the World Economic Forum, Microsoft, and been the opening Keynote at the Financial Times Camp Alphaville. He is a graduate of Columbia University, and lives in San Francisco with his physician wife and two young daughters. In a 5000-word feature on Zoltan, The New York Times wrote Zoltan is “polite and charismatic” and has a “plausibly Presidential aura.”

1.
Question 1

There is a shortage of affordable housing in California. How would you approach addressing California’s housing crisis? Please include specific proposals.

Answer from Zoltan Istvan:

There's a shortage for one reason and one reason only: Government regulation of the building industry is out of control. I made my money in real estate I know how difficult and practically insane it is to get anything done. The California housing crisis can be fixed by eliminating 75% of the regulation for builders. Only keep the most essential safety requreiments. Within a few years, a great majority of the housing woes will be over. And of course there will be a boom for the CA economy too.

2.
Question 2

California has some of the richest people in the country and some of the poorest. What would you do to reduce income inequality in California?

No answer provided.
3.
Question 3

Currently there isn't enough money in the state retirement system to pay for all the benefits promised to government workers. What would you do as Governor to address the state’s unfunded pension liability?

Answer from Zoltan Istvan:

I would make a promise to pay all agreed pensions, but stop any new type of benefits. Quite simply, we need to be more fiscally responsible, and that begins with hard choices. But for those pensions that exist, I would utilize federal land and monetize it to help pay for existing pension concerns and liabilities. I would absolutely not raise taxes. 

4.
Question 4

How would you describe your feelings about charter schools? Are you in favor of any changes in the way the state governs charter schools?

Answer from Zoltan Istvan:

I would highly encourage charger schools, and I believe that if a tax payer pays into the system, then the certain part of that money should go towards the education opportunities of their choice, including charter school, public education, private schooling, etc. We need more control of our educational choices. 

5.
Question 5

California and the federal government have disagreed about enforcement of immigration laws. Do you support California’s current ‘Sanctuary State’ law? If not, why not? Are there additional strategies that you would pursue as Governor?

Answer from Zoltan Istvan:

I support California being a sanctuary state, and I would encourage far more open border policies. I have easily the most open border policies of any CA gubernatorial candidate--and I propose better technology to monitor people so we can keep tabs on who comes across the border. Ultimately, I simply believe people should live where they want. But I would not give any welfare resources to the illegal immigrants, and I will not allow homelessness. You are welcome to come to California, but you must not be a burden on the state, nor be a burden on the public. 

Like many entrepreneurs, I became a libertarian because of one simple concept: reason. It just made sense to embrace a philosophy that promotes maximum freedom and personal accountability. “Hands off” was my motto—and in business, if you wanted to succeed, those words are sacred. But “hands off” applies to more than just good entrepreneurial economics. It applies to social life, politics, culture, religion, and especially how innovation occurs.

I’ve been a passionate science and technology guy—an advocate of radical innovation—ever since I can remember. In college, I focused on the ethics and challenges of science for my Philosophy degree. But my stories for National Geographic and my witnessing of the Great Recession viscerally reminded me that government and the growing fundamentalism in Congress was desperately trying to control innovation and progress—even at the expense of people’s health, safety, and prosperity. With plenty of free time after the sale of my business to mount a challenge, I decided to take science and technology into the public and political realm; I decided to make a run for the U.S. presidency in 2016 as the self-described “science candidate.”

I knew I couldn’t win the election, but it was a great way to awaken many Americans to the desperate plight of our country’s increasingly stifled science and innovation sector. My experience in media has helped propel my candidacy. I spoke at the World Bank, appeared on The Joe Rogan Experience podcast, was interviewed by the hacker collective Anonymous, and consulted for the U.S. Navy about technology, among other things. Even 2016 Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson invited me to interview as his possible vice president. Alone in his New Mexico house, we talked shop for 24 hours solid. He chose Governor Bill Weld as his VP, but I left Johnson knowing I would soon be making a stand for the Libertarian Party.     

Due to the fact I was arguably the first visible science presidential candidate in American history, I ran a very centric, science and tech-oriented platform, one that was designed to be as inclusive of as many political lines as possible. With leadership comes some compromise, and I veered both right and left (mostly left) to try to satisfy as many people as I could, even when it meant going against some of my own personal opinions. I believe a politician represents the people, and he or she must never forget that—or forget the honor that such a task carries.

One thing I didn’t stray from was my belief that everything could be solved best by the ‘scientific method’—the bastion of reason that says a thing or idea works only if you can prove it again and again via objective, independent evaluation. I’ll always be a pragmatic rationalist, and reason to me is the primary motivator when considering how to tackle problems, social or otherwise. I continue to passionately believe in the promise of using reason, science and technology to better California and the world. After all, the standard of living has been going up around the globe because of a singular factor: more people have access to new science and technology than ever before. Nothing moves the world forward like innovation does.

Yet, in the political climate of 2018, few things seem more at risk as innovation. A conservative, religious government stands to overwhelm California with worries about radical tech and science, such as implementing Federal regulation that stifles artificial intelligence, driverless cars, stem cells, drones, and genetic editing.

Sadly, the same could be said of immigration, women’s rights, and environmental issues. Then there’s America’s move towards expanding its already overly expensive military, which you and I pay for out of our pockets so that generals can fight far-off wars. America can do better than this. California can do better than this.

And we must. After all, the world is changing—and changing quite dramatically. Even libertarians like me face the real possibility that capitalism and job competition—which we always advocated for—won’t survive into the next few decades because of widespread automation and the proliferation of robot workers. Then there’s the burgeoning dilemma of cyber security and unwanted tracking of the technology that citizens use. And what of augmenting intelligence via genetic editing—something the Chinese are leading the charge on, but most Americans seem too afraid to try? In short, what can be done to ensure the best future?

Much can be done. And I believe it can all be done best via a libertarian framework, which is precisely why I am declaring my run for 2018 California governor. We need leadership that is willing to use radical science, technology, and innovation—what California is famous for—to benefit us all. We need someone with the nerve to risk the tremendous possibilities to save the environment through bioengineering, to end cancer by seeking a vaccine or a gene-editing solution for it, to embrace startups that will take California from the world’s 7th largest economy to maybe even the largest economy—bigger than the rest of America altogether. And believe me when I say this is possible: artificial intelligence and genetic editing will become some of the first multi-trillion dollar businesses in the near future.

We can do this, California, and it doesn’t have to be through stale blue or red political parties, which have left many of us aghast at the current world. It can be done through the libertarian philosophy of embracing all that is the most inventive and unbridled in us—and letting that pave the way forward. A challenging future awaits us, but we can meet it head on and lead the way not just for California and America, but for all of humanity.

— April 2, 2018 World Fair Nano

Zoltan Istvan dicsussed the Future of Basic Income via his Federal Land Dividend

Democratic
California State Treasurer
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • I will tackle California’s affordable housing crisis, including putting a roof over the heads of an additional 4 million low-income and middle-class Californians.
  • I will restore public education through free universal early childhood education, reducing class sizes, increasing per-pupil funding, providing 2 years of free community college, and reducing UC and CSU tuition by more than 40%.
  • I will stand up to the dangerous policies coming out of Washington and protect jobs here in California, invest in our crumbling roads and bridges, make health care more affordable, defend our immigrants, and continue the fight against climate change.
Profession:California State Treasurer
State Treasurer, State of California — Elected position (2015current)
State Controller, State of California — Elected position (20072015)
Board Member, California State Board of Equalization — Elected position (19992007)
Board Member, California State Board of Equalization — Appointed position (19971999)
Georgetown University Law Center Juris Doctorate (JD) (1987)
University of South Florida Bachelor of Arts (BA), Finance (1984)
  • Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones
  • Board of Equalization Member Fiona Ma
  • Congressman Alan Lowenthal
  • Speaker Anthony Rendon
  • Congresswoman Judy Chu
  • Congressman Mike Honda (Ret.)
  • Congressman Ted Lieu
  • Congresswoman Grace Napolitano
  • Congresswoman Linda Sanchez
  • Congressman Brad Sherman
  • Congressman Mark Takano
  • Assemblymember Ed Chau
  • Assemblymember Kansen Chu
  • Assemblymember Warren Furutani (Ret.)
  • Assemblymember Evan Low
  • Assemblymember Jim Frazier
  • Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi
  • Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher
  • Assemblymember Patrick O’Donnell
  • Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva
  • State Senator Richard Pan
  • State Senator Bob Wieckowski
  • State Senator Anthony Portantino
  • AFSCME District Council 36
  • IUOE LOCAL 501
  • IUOE State Unit 12
  • ILWU Southern California District Council
  • Northern California Carpenters Regional Council
  • Operating Engineers Local 39
  • United Nurses Association of California/Union of Health Care Professionals (UNAC/UHCP), AFSCME
  • Association of California State Supervisors (ACSS)
  • AFT Staff Guild, Local 1521A
  • Fresno County Young Democrats
  • West Hollywood/Beverly Hills Democratic Club
  • Tri Counties Democratic Club
  • Southern California Armenian Democrats
  • Silicon Valley Asian Pacific American Democratic Club
  • Sacramento County Young Democrats
  • AAPI Democratic Club of San Diego
  • Asian Pacific American Democratic Caucus of Alameda County
  • Black Young Democrats of Sacramento County
  • Korean American Democratic Committee
  • Culver City Democratic Club
  • Democrats for Israel-Los Angeles
  • Fontana Democratic Club
  • Burbank Democratic Club
  • Riverside County Young Democrats
  • Network for Public Education (NPE) Action
1.
Question 1

There is a shortage of affordable housing in California. How would you approach addressing California’s housing crisis? Please include specific proposals.

Answer from John Chiang:

It’s simply unaffordable to live in California anymore. A third of our state’s renters spend more than half of their earnings on housing costs. California is home to 12 percent of the nation’s population and 22 percent of the nation’s homeless. In a public survey last year, 60 percent of Californians said housing costs have forced their children and close friends to move away – and shockingly, a full 40 percent said they have someone in their immediate circle living on the streets. That’s why I’ve made affordable housing such an important priority in my time as Treasurer and in my campaign for governor. California needs to get serious about fixing our affordable housing crisis.

 

I’m already taking steps to address affordable housing right now. As Treasurer, I overhauled my office’s affordable housing programs, leading to an 80 percent increase in the number of homes built or rehabilitated since 2014. I also helped lead the coalition last year to fight for an affordable housing bond, and advocated for SB 2 and SB 3, placing a $4 billion housing bond on the ballot in 2018. But that $4 billion is just a down payment for what our state really needs.

 

I strongly believe we need to look at this issue holistically—from land use, to bonding authority, to redevelopment agencies, to housing development—if we’re going to solve this issue. Rent control needs to be a part of our affordable housing strategy, too. However, California is short an incredible 1.5 million units of affordable housing. We need to fix the supply issue if we want to stabilize and bring down housing costs. That’s why, within the decade, my goal is to place a roof over the heads of an additional four million low- and moderate-income Californians by investing additional public resources into affordable housing production and doubling local government permitting activity for all types of housing.

 

I’m running for Governor because I’m proud of my record fighting for creative and effective solutions to improve the lives of California families. I have consistently fought to protect California’s economy and build a better future for working people, so that all our kids have the opportunity to achieve their American Dream. This is one of those instances where California could benefit from my nearly 20 years of experience and my record of finding fiscally responsible ways to improve the lives of Californians.

2.
Question 2

California has some of the richest people in the country and some of the poorest. What would you do to reduce income inequality in California?

Answer from John Chiang:

California needs a governor with a proven track record of fighting for working families.

 

Look at my record. I stood up to Gov. Schwarzenegger when he tried to reduce the salaries of state employees to the minimum wage. I withheld the pay of our state lawmakers when they failed to pass a balanced budget on time, as required by the state constitution. And when Wells Fargo ripped off millions of Americans, I held them accountable for their predatory practices and cut them off from their most profitable line of business with the state.

 

1)    We need to protect working families and their ability to provide for their families. . I proudly supported the Fight for $15 because every worker deserves to earn a living wage. It’s time we close the wage gap, ensure equal pay for equal work, expand paid family leave, and raise wages so workers can afford to care for their families. I also support expanding childcare and universal free early childhood education.

2)    Tackling Affordable Housing- One third of our state’s renters spend more than half of their earnings on housing, and those statistics are much worse for communities of color. We must think big and act boldly to address a problem that has metastasized from a crisis to an economic and humanitarian crisis. Every Californian has a right to an affordable, decent place to call home.

3)    Making Higher Education Affordable Again- Higher education creates ladders of opportunities for individuals to achieve their dreams and escape poverty. Unfortunately, the ability to afford higher education is becoming increasingly difficult for California families. As governor, I will fight to cut UC and CSU tuition by more than 40 percent over the next decade for in-state residents. My plan also calls for all Californians to have access to two free years of community college, and prioritizes Californians in the enrollment process for public colleges and universities.

4)    Protecting Retirement Security- Nearly half of California’s workers are on track to retire with incomes below 200%  of the federal poverty level. For this reason, I was one of the chief architects of Secure Choice, now called CalSavers, the most ambitious push to expand retirement security since the passage of Social Security in the 1930s. Despite efforts by the current Trump-era Congress to block CalSavers, as governor I will continue to push back and forge ahead with implementing this critical retirement savings plan for 7.5 million individuals.

 

California has tough issues we need to tackle. I have a proven track record of delivering concrete solutions to our state’s fiscal challenges. If California is going to continue to lead on the issues we care about, we need a governor who can manage our money. Voters can trust that I not only have a progressive vision, but you can also trust me to manage the world's sixth largest economy and fight to protect California's working people.

3.
Question 3

Currently there isn't enough money in the state retirement system to pay for all the benefits promised to government workers. What would you do as Governor to address the state’s unfunded pension liability?

Answer from John Chiang:

After a lifetime of hard work, every Californian deserves a secure retirement.

 

I strongly support defined-benefit pension plans for all workers, especially public employees who sacrifice higher wages in the private sector to serve our communities. I reject the idea that pensions are a thing of the past, and that lawmakers need to make a false choice between either increasing taxes to fund retirement benefits or else get rid of pensions altogether for public employees. That’s why, as an ex-officio board member, I’ve fought to protect benefits and improve the financial stability of the CalPERS and CalSTRS systems.

 

At a time when more and more Californians are facing an uncertain and unsecure retirement, we can’t exacerbate the problem by taking away pensions. Instead, we need to create a secure retirement for everyone. That’s why I helped create and now chair the CalSavers (Secure Choice) program, so that workers without a pension on the job still have access to a secure retirement. CalSavers has been described as the most significant change to retirement savings since Social Security was enacted in the 1930s, and will help up to 7.5 million Californians save for their retirement— with almost no cost to the state.

 

That’s not to say that we should avoid the tough questions about how to put our public pension systems on sounder footing. Those issues are absolutely necessary if we want to protect defined benefit pension plans in the future. But we cannot replace defined benefits plans with 401(k) defined contribution plans, which were only ever meant to be a supplemental way for workers to save for retirement. As someone who has held all three of the state's elected financial positions, and as a board member of our state public pension systems, I have a strong record of fighting to protect public pension benefits. I believe it is a moral imperative to ensure all seniors can retire with dignity. As governor, I will tackle these issues with the same sensible fiscal solutions I’ve offered my entire career.

4.
Question 4

How would you describe your feelings about charter schools? Are you in favor of any changes in the way the state governs charter schools?

Answer from John Chiang:

Whether we like it or not, charter schools are here to stay. The best charters provide a laboratory for experimentation and allow students and parents to explore varied educational options not provided in the mainstream public schools. Some charters do an outstanding job of preparing students for college—just as traditional schools and magnets do.

 

However, charter schools are public schools. They need to be transparent and held accountable in the same way that traditional schools are. Charter schools should be subject to the Brown Act and state conflict of interest standards. Charter schools must be operated in the interest of the students of the district as a whole; we must avoid creating a two-tiered educational system where all of the most motivated and ambitious families abandon traditional schools. Charter schools should remain neutral and not oppose efforts by its employees to form or join a union if they so choose. At the same time, school districts must recognize the innovative education opportunities charters provide and work to offer the same types of programs and alternatives.

 

In the end, we want every student to have an equal opportunity to pursue their dreams. As governor, I will continue to boldly lead on this issue and do whatever it takes to bring transparency, accountability and fairness to California’s charter schools.

5.
Question 5

California and the federal government have disagreed about enforcement of immigration laws. Do you support California’s current ‘Sanctuary State’ law? If not, why not? Are there additional strategies that you would pursue as Governor?

Answer from John Chiang:

My parents came to this country with virtually nothing, dreaming of a better future for their family. My father came here with just three shirts, two pairs of pants, and hardly anything in his pocket. And despite the taunts and the ugly racial slurs, my family never gave up believing in the American Dream— just like the millions of other immigrants that come to this country believing in that dream.

 

California has long paved the way in the national battle for immigrant rights.

 

I supported SB 54, California’s sanctuary state bill, and I will defend it as governor. I strongly believe it is not the job of our state, county and local law enforcement officers to turn the cogs on President Trump’s deportation machine. I will explore all legal routes and provide legal assistance to ensure all individuals have access to legal defense. We can’t let the federal government tear families apart and build walls to separate us.

 

And we must fight to keep this country’s promise to Dreamers — like the young woman on my staff, who joined our campaign as an intern from UCLA. We were able to hire her after she graduated. Now Dreamers are back in legal limbo because of President Trump. Congress must protect our DACA kids and pass a Dream Act.

 

As governor, I will fight for Congress to adopt a long-term solution to fix our broken immigration system. First and foremost, we need an immigration reform plan that gives immigrants a path to citizenship. We can’t keep workers in a temporary status forever. For those immigrants working in our country through a guest worker visa, many are shackled to their abusive employers for fear that that their visa may be revoked. Immigrants should have the right to report abuses from their employers and to change jobs without risking their visa status or risk deportation. We must do more to fix the system so we’re not creating and perpetuating a permanent subclass of marginalized immigrant workers.

Total money raised: $5,661,079

Top contributors that gave money to support the candidate, by organization:

1
MWM Global Holdings
$58,400
1
Northern California Carpenters Regional Council
$58,400
1
ThinkTank Learning
$58,400
1
United Nurses Associations of California Union of Health Care Professionals
$58,400
2
JLJ (USA) Properties LLC
$57,312

By State:

California 92.53%
New York 2.66%
District of Columbia 1.00%
Nevada 0.76%
Other 3.05%
92.53%

By Size:

Large contributions (98.42%)
Small contributions (1.58%)
98.42%

By Type:

From organizations (34.69%)
From individuals (65.31%)
34.69%65.31%
Source: MapLight analysis of data from the California Secretary of State.
— May 5, 2018 John Chiang for Governor 2018
— May 5, 2018 John Chiang for Governor 2018
— May 5, 2018 John Chiang for Governor 2018
Peace and Freedom
Graphic Artist
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • Guarantee housing for all: Ban evictions • Overturn anti-tenant Costa-Hawkins and Ellis Laws • Healthcare for All: Support Single-Payer • Tax major companies, banks, military contractors for a pro-people state budget • Full rights for immigrants now
  • Prosecute police abuse; End mass incarceration • End fracking & offshore oil drilling • Regulate agribusiness water use to ensure clean drinking water for communities • Promote policies to end racism, sexism & anti-LGBTQ bigotry
  • Strengthen union rights • Make state universities free • Fully fund Childcare & Senior Care • Money for Jobs, Not for War!
Profession:Gloria La Riva is a labor & community activist

Gloria La Riva is a labor, community and anti­-war activist based in San Francisco, California. Born in Albuquerque, N.M., Gloria attended Brandeis University where she was active in affirmative action struggles.

Gloria has been a key organizer of many mass demonstrations and other actions opposing U.S. wars and occupation in Central America, Iraq, Palestine, Afghanistan, Yugoslavia, South Korea, Libya, Syria, Niger, and elsewhere.

Gloria has worked for decades to defend Cuba’s sovereignty and against the U.S. blockade. She was awarded Cuba’s Friendship Medal in 2010, approved by the Council of State, for her many years of Cuba solidarity, and is the national coordinator of the Cuba and Venezuela Solidarity Committee.

Gloria has traveled to Venezuela many times since the election of Hugo Chávez to president in 1998, most recently in March 2018. She has engaged in discussions with leading members of the Bolivarian Revolution, including the late president, as well as current President Nicolás Maduro.

Gloria has been active in the struggle for immigrant rights, organizing for and speaking at many mass marches in California over the past 30 years. In the early 1990's, she was the initiator of the Farmworkers Emergency Relief campaign, following a disastrous freeze that left tens of thousands of Central Valley agricultural workers with no income.

Gloria organized support for the Black Fire Fighters Association in their struggle to end racist and sexist discrimination in the San Francisco Fire Department in the 1980's.

A long­time supporter of LGBTQ rights, Gloria participated in the first National March for Lesbian and Gay rights in 1979 and subsequent national marches. She joined in the marches and rallies protesting the passage of the anti­-marriage­ equality Prop 8 in California. She has joined picket lines defending women’s reproductive health clinics.

In 1998 Gloria produced the award­-winning video, Genocide by Sanctions: The Case of Iraq, documenting the effects of the U.S./UN blockade on Iraq. In 1999, she traveled twice to Yugoslavia with former U.S. attorney general Ramsey Clark, at the height of the U.S./NATO bombing war, producing the video, NATO Targets. In September 2005, six days after Hurricane Katrina, Gloria traveled to New Orleans, producing the video Heroes Not Looters. In 2014, she traveled to Ferguson during the uprising there in the wake of the police murder of Michael Brown.

Gloria is a contributor for LiberationNews.org, where she has written extensively on Latin America and many other issues.

In 1994 and 1998, Gloria was Peace & Freedom Party’s candidate for governor of California. She ran as a socialist candidate for mayor of San Francisco in 1983, finishing third overall and second in every working­-class neighborhood. She was the 2008 and 2016 presidential candidate of the Party for Socialism and Liberation, Peace and Freedom Party and the Liberty Union Party. She is the elected First Vice-President of the Pacific Media Workers Guild, Communications Workers of America, Local 39521.

No Party Preference
Virtual Reality Manager
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • Board of Regret (Regents): The governor of California will no longer have the power to appoint the 18 regents for the nine UC campuses. The members of the Board of Regents will be elected by the students of the UCs. Increase CA school funding.
  • Mandating that each health care insurance company gives each customer a FREE health care monitoring device. Opening a public health record database for companies to use artificial intelligence to better predict customer's health future.
  • Ban Social Media K-12. Legalize Sports Gambling. Lower State, income, and gas taxes. Create centralized profiles of all office holders's money activity and their progress towards their platforms they advocated for during election season.
Profession:Virtual Reality Manager
Virtual Reality Manager, Virtual Reality Company in San Francisco, California (20172018)
Ambassador, HBO (20162017)
Consultant, Dream Out Loud Productions (20162016)
UCLA Bachelors, Major-Economics. Minor-Film and Television (2017)
Tennis Competitive Player, United States Tennis Association (20092018)
Tennis Competitive Player, United States Tennis Association (20092018)
Indus Member, Indus UCLA (20142017)
President, Indian Student Alliance (20102013)
1.
Question 1

There is a shortage of affordable housing in California. How would you approach addressing California’s housing crisis? Please include specific proposals.

Answer from Shubham Goel:

 Local zoning, outdating laws, long approvals, and massive lack of housing has caused prices to astronomically soar and cause longterm California residents to leave the city. A McKinsey study states we need 3 million more housing units by 2025 to keep up with capacity. First thing we should do is to allow 100 percent residential development on vacant commercial zoned properties as many of these properties have available space and land. Los Angeles does this and they are the fastest-growing housing production in California right now. Also we must reduce the approval/rejection time of housing projects to 6-12 months so that local jurisdictions can make quicker decisions and building can be completed quicker. I will enforce this w/ a punishment of a $30,000 fine for 3 repeat offenses and a loss of local authority for development projects for a 4th. I also strongly support and propose an amended Senator [Scott] Wiener’s SB 827 bill that allocates for 4-8 story transit housing within .5 miles of transit in San Francisco. I would like to amend his bill to include tech companies that have more than 2,000 employees, tech companies that are coming into California with 500-plus employees. We will include a vacancy tax and have anti displacement provisions. This will now compensate for these companies bringing all these jobs without creating housing for them. This solution will create millions of housing units for California, lower the price of the housing market and increase mobility in California as more people using transit.

 

In addition, we will use 3-D printing technology to create low cost affordable housing to massively increase our housing supply.

2.
Question 2

California has some of the richest people in the country and some of the poorest. What would you do to reduce income inequality in California?

Answer from Shubham Goel:

Ax the tax and let’s relax: We are in a budget surplus of about $6 billion and now it is the time to reward the grieving Californian taxpayers. We don’t need more tax revenue but much better allocation of our budget. I will help enact huge tax cuts for California and lower regulations on small businesses to encourage economic growth. Sales tax will go from 7.25 percent to 5 percent. Top marginal income tax rate will go from 13.3 percent to 4.9 percent. Property tax rate will go from 0.75 percent to 0.5 percent. Lowering taxes for all people will help stimulate the economy. 

Force each health insurance company to provide a health monitoring device out of their profits to each of their patients. This will save billions in preventive costs in healthcare for people who struggle to afford premiums and deductibles. 

 

Venture California: We will create a venture capital fund of $100 million that will invest in California companies that help fix the water shortage problem, housing crisis and healthcare epidemic. Water has become an extremely scarce commodity that California is in desperate need of for droughts, fires and farms. We must use innovative strategies with these funded companies, such as desalination. An increased demand for housing and outdated regulations has destroyed the housing market and made affordable housing nonexistent for Californians. We must pursue efficient building strategies with companies to effectively increase the supply of housing in California. Lastly, we must invest in companies that will develop and create the next generation of health and medical devices. This will improve health and cut health care costs.

3.
Question 3

Currently there isn't enough money in the state retirement system to pay for all the benefits promised to government workers. What would you do as Governor to address the state’s unfunded pension liability?

Answer from Shubham Goel:

I will cut many inefficient projects that are currently being enacted in california and redistribute money and create new forms of tax revenue from the legalization of state wide gambling. 

I will legalize statewide gambling and that will generate billions in dollars in tax revenue which we can divert some of to the unfunded pension liability. If we are legalizing weed to capture the tax revenue then it makes no sense to keep gambling illegal in california as well. 

I will also defund the 10 billion dollar abysmal Water tunnel as it will not be effective in any capacity at solving out water crisis. 

The Great High Speed Railway Trainwreck: We must defund the high speed railway. The high speed railway train is the most inefficient project in California. I will defund and cut the project completely for California. The budget and timeline dramatically changes every couple of years. The budget was $40 billion in 2004 and now it’s reported that the budget is over $77 billion. We were assured that private investors will pay a significant part of this train, but not many private investors have stepped up, which means the burden will continue to fall on the taxpayer. 

With these reallocated funds we will pay 5% including the interest of the unfunded liabilities annualy.

4.
Question 4

How would you describe your feelings about charter schools? Are you in favor of any changes in the way the state governs charter schools?

Answer from Shubham Goel:

The State needs to create boards for each charters comprised of the parents of students who attend those schools. Those parents will provide detailed anaylsis of the school's agenda and actions to the state who will have the power to defund the charter school based on those reports. 

Any charter school that is found to be negligent with enrollment policies that discourage out of community students to join will be defunded after the 3rd finding. 

 

 

5.
Question 5

California and the federal government have disagreed about enforcement of immigration laws. Do you support California’s current ‘Sanctuary State’ law? If not, why not? Are there additional strategies that you would pursue as Governor?

Answer from Shubham Goel:

We need to streamline the immigration office in California to expedite the immigration process. 5 Billion dollars needs to be reallocated from our inefficient funds including the water tunnel, high speed trainway will be distributed towards UCSIS in order to account for the increased number of applications. 

 

We also should digitalize the whole process and automate many steps as the physical mailing and handling of papers slows down the process exponentially. 

Improving HealthCare dramatically with insurance companies giving free monitoring devices and opening a public database

Summary

Improving HealthCare dramatically with insurance companies giving health free monitoring devices to customers and opening a public database of health records. This public database will be used by health care companies who will use the data with artificial intelligence to better predict patients health futures.

Also I will mandate that every single health care insurer provides a free IOT (internet of things) health monitoring medical device to patients. The patient can choose a device from a assortment of options and these devices will provide real time data to the doctor and to the patient themselves. This will cut health care costs dramatically as the patients will now be able to actively monitor their health much better from anywhere while also having a faster more streamlined connection with their doctor and digital records.

 

Health care has several inefficiencies that can be improved which will lower costs and provide better care for the people of California. The first thing I will do is mandate that the government releases health care data of willing Medicare and Medical patients into a public database so that California health insurers who use artificial intelligence can use the data to predict health situations of new patients much better. The public database will be open to anyone willing to donate their health data. This will lower costs as a whole and will save billions through preventive measures. Also I will mandate that every single health care insurer provides a free IOT (internet of things) health monitoring medical device to patients. The patient can choose a device from a assortment of options and these devices will provide real time data to the doctor and to the patient themselves. This will cut health care costs dramatically as the patients will now be able to actively monitor their health much better from anywhere while also having a faster more streamlined connection with their doctor and digital records.

Board of Regents being chosen by the UC students instead of the governo

Summary

Board of Regents being appointed by the students intead of the Governor. This will prevent corruption and encourage massive representation and transperancy. 

 Board of Regret (Regents): The governor of California should no longer have the power to appoint the 18 regents for the nine  UC campuses. The members of the Board of Regents will be elected by the students of the UCs. This will make the Board more accountable, transparent and representative of the UC students and campuses they reside over. This will fix disturbing issues like Janet Napolitano, the president of the UC system, hiding $175 million last April from students, the board mishandling funds and regents being financially corrupt.

Centralized Transparent Profiles for all office holders in California.

Summary

Digitalized and centralized profiles of all california office holders that shows their previous financial transactions and their progress towards their platforms they advocated for during election season. 

GovBook: All office holders in California will have a transparent digital profile on the governor’s website. This will show their economic interactions for the past 10 years with regard to money and donations they have received from any sources, including the people who control them and investments they currently have. It will also include the platforms they advocated for during their election cycle and will comment on their progress toward completing them. This will keep all of them accountable with their decisions, corruption and ineffectiveness and give the people of California a much better idea of whom they are being represented by.

— April 30, 2018 Shubham Goel

Youngest candidate, Shubham Goel, describes his previous experience and why that will help him fix the state for all people.

— April 30, 2018 Shubham Goel

Shubham Goel's platform, Board of Regret, where he states that the board of regents will be appointed by the students of the UC's instead of the governor. The board holds so much power over the UC's so this will be great for accountability, and transparency for the students. 

Libertarian
Recording Artist
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • Tax relief including but not limited to tax cuts and reduction in government spending.
  • Improve social conditions regarding education, homelessness, etc.
  • Strengthen relationship with public by holding state representatives accountable.
Profession:Recording Artist / Rapper
Los Angeles Recording School Recording Engineering, Sound recording engineering (2005)

Transitioning his desire to make a change in the world through music as the rap artist known as QBall, to becoming the human rights activist “Governor Wildstar”, Libertarian candidate Nickolas Wildstar now pursues to make a change through politics. As the first Libertarian governor of any state in the US, Nickolas Wildstar seeks the opportunity to establish California as the foundation for a world free of poverty, conflict, and scarcity as ‘WE THE PEOPLE‘ have been demanding. This 20 year working class professional aims to minimize taxes, drastically reduce government’s wasteful spending, and restoring the right for citizens to make their own personal choices regarding education, healthcare, and our own bodies. Join Nickolas Wildstar and be sure to become part of this monumental opportunity to establish a true republic in this great democracy!

Total money raised: $15,581

Top contributors that gave money to support the candidate, by organization:

1
Morning Star Company
$5,000
2
William H. Brickner, PhD
$4,000
3
Libertarian Party of California
$1,000
4
Mackintosh & Mackintosh, Inc.
$800
5
CEO
$250

By State:

California 97.67%
Ohio 1.20%
Wisconsin 0.80%
Georgia 0.32%
97.67%

By Size:

Large contributions (79.93%)
Small contributions (20.07%)
79.93%20.07%

By Type:

From organizations (8.03%)
From individuals (91.97%)
8.03%91.97%
Source: MapLight analysis of data from the California Secretary of State.
Green
Author
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • Modernize the 1957 state water policy: implement water recycling to increase water stock in all city reservoirs, "light desalination" (the way the sun makes clouds), ban fracking, ban water bottling for private profit.
  • Afforable housing: regulate AirBnB hotel-systems such that the owner must live in the house for at least 6 months a year, repeal Costa Hawkins, build public housing.
  • Abolish private prison slavery & end mass incarceration. Free everyone who is in prison for crimes which are no longer illegal.
Profession:Author & Solar Electric Designer
Total money raised: $9,500

Top contributors that gave money to support the candidate, by organization:

1
Lightning Creek
$5,000
2
Institute of Energy Studies, UC Davis
$2,000

By State:

California 100.00%
100.00%

By Size:

Large contributions (100.00%)
Small contributions (0.00%)
100.00%

By Type:

From organizations (0.00%)
From individuals (100.00%)
100.00%
Source: MapLight analysis of data from the California Secretary of State.

Josh's platform is based on two principles: maximize equality of opportunity, and minimize harm.

We will take no money from corporations.

Josh has made a special pledge to take absolutely no coal, oil, or fracking money.

Corporate-free and people powered.

Republican
Policomedian - Serious politics mixed with comedy.
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • Helping people to get rich using #CESP5 method.
  • Setting up Community Empowered Safety Plan in all cities to combat riots, terrorism and crime.
  • Spreading #CESP worldwide to enable world peace.
Profession:Policomedian - Serious politics mixed with comedy.
No Party Preference
Business Owner
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • Revamped the high-speed rail system
  • Repeal the gas tax that has been bestowed upon us in the last several months
  • California will not become a sanctuary State and we will take a look at the immigration issues
Profession:Retired truck driver/business owner
OTR truck driver, Southern Refrigerated Transport (20092018)
Business owner, Lassen Modoc Express (20122018)
Lassen Community College Associates degree, Construction management (1981)
Democratic
Public Policy Advisor
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My List'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter’s Edge.
  • I’ve said again and again my top three priorities are high-wage jobs, high-wage jobs and high-wage jobs. That’s because economic opportunity and economic equality are the very foundation of the California Dream.
  • Lifting families out of poverty lowers crime, increases levels of health and even increases academic achievement in schools. Expanding the middle class helps heal the festering wound of income inequality.
  • High wage jobs creates dramatically more tax revenue – which we can invest in better schools, roads and rail, building more affordable housing, creating affordable and universal healthcare, and protecting our environment.
Profession:Public Policy Advisor; Former Mayor of Los Angeles