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November 8, 2016 — Elección General de California
Local

City of Costa Mesa
Measure Z Ordinance - Majority Approval Required

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Resultados electorales

Se aprueba

20,506 votos si (55.8%)

16,258 votos no (44.2%)

100% de distritos activos (66/66).

Shall the Costa Mesa Measure for Sensible Community Development and Development-Funded Open Space and Recreation, which ratifies the City's existing land use regulations, ensures that approximately 25% of the State Developmental Hospital on Harbor Boulevard would be zoned as passive or recreational open space, and establishes a fee paid for by developers for the purpose of funding new active recreation, open space, and public park facilities within the City, be adopted?

¿Qué es esta propuesta?

Información básica sobre la iniciativa de ley — Información oficial sobre esta iniciativa

Un voto por el SÍ significa

A “Yes” vote is a vote to approve the Measure for Sensible Community Development and DevelopmentFunded Open Space and Recreation, which ratifies and re-adopts the City’s existing zoning and land use regulations (including without limitation, its General Plan, Specific Plans, and Title 13 of the City’s Zoning Code) and amends the City’s Municipal Code to establish a development impact fee, which would be applicable to all new development in the City that is located both north of the 405 and west of Fairview Drive.

Un voto por el NO significa

A “No” vote is a vote not to approve the Measure for Sensible Community Development and DevelopmentFunded Open Space and Recreation.

Antecedentes

No document was submitted.

Análisis del analista legislativo / Proposal

Orange County Registrar of Voters

The purpose of this measure (the “Measure”) is to directly compete with the initiative known as “The Initiative To Require Voter Approval of Certain Development Projects” (the “Initiative”).

If adopted, the Measure would amend the Municipal Code to add a development impact fee known as the Open Space and Public Park Impact Fee, which would be applicable to all new development located both north of the 405 freeway and west of Fairview Drive. The Fee is intended to offset the impacts that new development has upon recreational opportunities. It is to be used for the purpose of increasing active recreation, open space and public park facilities within the City. While not specifically tied to the development of Fairview Developmental Center, upon its anticipated closure, the Fee would be available to fund open space and recreational activities at that site. The Measure sets the Fee at the maximum amount permissible pursuant to the Mitigation Fee Act, and requires compliance with the requirements of that Act; but caps the Fee at $1.50/square foot of new development. The Measure would also result in the creation of an Open Space & Recreation Advisory Committee with a limited duration to advise the City Council on expenditures of the new Open Space and Public Park Impact Fee.

The Measure would by ordinance ratify and adopt the City’s General Plan adopted on June 21, 2016; the Baker Street and Paularino Avenue Specific Plan (SP-78-02), the Placentia/Hamilton/Pomona/19th Specific Plan (SP-79-01), the Bristol Street Specific Plan (SP-82-01), the East 17th Street Specific Plan (SP-84-01), the Harbor/Bernard/Parsons/Ford Specific Plan (SP-84-02), the North Costa Mesa Specific Plan (SP-94-01), the Avocado Street Specific Plan (SP 86-01), the Newport Boulevard Specific Plan (SP-96-01), the Costa Mesa Theater & Arts District Plan (SP-0301), the SoBECA Urban Plan (SP-05-06), the 19 West Urban Plan (SP-05-07), the Mesa West Bluffs Urban Plan (SP-05-08), the Mesa West Residential Ownership Urban Plan (SP-05-09); and Title 13 of the Costa Mesa Municipal Code (Planning, Zoning and Development).

This Measure comprehensively regulates the same subject as the Initiative. It directly competes with, and specifically rejects the changes to the Municipal Code proposed by the Initiative. If a majority of voters approve both the Initiative and the Measure, the one with the higher percentage of the vote will control. If both measures are approved and the Measure receives a higher percentage of the vote than the Initiative, none of the changes or additions proposed by the Initiative will be implemented.

Any future changes or amendments to the ordinance proposed by the Measure, including changes or amendments to the General Plan, Special Plan(s), Overlay Plan(s), or Municipal Code provisions affected by it, may occur in the manner set forth by law, and shall not require a vote of the people; excepting that any change to the General Plan provisions that call for approximately 25 acres of the Fairview Development Center site to be zoned as either passive or recreational open space upon its closure would require a vote of the people.

The above statement is an impartial analysis of Measure Z. If you desire a copy of the measure, please call the elections official’s office at 714-754-5225 and a copy will be mailed at no cost to you.

Efectos fiscales

No document was submitted.

Tax rate

No document was submitted.

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Argumento A FAVOR

Almost 5,000 adults and children use Costa Mesa’s athletic fields.

Costa Mesa is sports-field poor. We don’t have enough fields for soccer, baseball, or youth football.

The Parks Commission estimates we need new multi-purpose fields to meet 2016’s demand.

MAKES DEVELOPERS PAY FOR NEW FIELDS

Measure Z helps fix our shortage of sports fields, and the developers pay for it.

Early estimates show over $1 million in developer fees could be used for the fields.

Measure Z sets aside 25% of the State Developmental Hospital upon its closure for active and passive recreational uses.

3rd LARGEST PARK IN CITY

At almost 26 acres, Yes on Measure Z will bring us the third largest park in the city.

Half the size of Tewinkle Park and twice the size of Lions Park, this park will be the last major park the city will ever build.

SOLVES THE FIELD SHORTAGE PROBLEM

Costa Mesa is built out – with only 2% of the city’s land left. Fairview’s 103 acres is perfectly located off Harbor Blvd. for our youth and adult recreation.

• 13 organized sports groups now use Costa Mesa athletic fields.

• In 2014 the city permitted 51,016 hours of time on all fields we permit in the city. That’s equivalent to 6 years of time.

CITIZENS COMMISSION – NOT POLITICIANS - MAKE THE PLANS

Measure Z creates a 7 member Citizens Committee to plan the State Hospital’s recreational projects.

Representatives from each member of the youth sports organizations, the school board, environmentalists, and the city will guide the Fairview planning process.

MEASURE Z IS A COMPROMISE PLAN

Youth sports, adult sports, and public health experts agree that recreational fields help knit the community together.

The State Developmental Hospital is our best chance to add active fields and park space to Costa Mesa.

Vote Yes on Z.

s/ James Righeimer Mayor Pro Tem, City of Costa Mesa

s/ Gordon Bowley President, Costa Mesa United

s/ Lee Ramos Senior Center Commissioner

s/ Brett Eckles Chairman, Costa Mesa Parks and Recreation Commission

s/ Bruce Skibby President, AYSO Region 97

— Orange County Registrar of Voters

Argumento EN CONTRA

Vote No on Measure Z.

There is nothing “sensible” about Measure Z .

Measure Z was cooked up by politicians trying to trick you into throwing away your right to vote on Costa Mesa’s future, a right you’d ensure under the citizens’ Initiative to Require Voter Approval of Certain Development Projects, also on this ballot.

Measure Z puts your stamp of approval on pro-developer politicians’ plans to:

• Increase residential densities to build 4-5 story apartment buildings with massive parking garages

• Increase Costa Mesa’s population by 19%

• Increase nonresidential development by 18%

• Reduce setbacks

• Reduce open space

• Increase traffic and pollution

• Degrade our quality of life

Once approved by the voters, it could be more difficult to roll back any of these changes—even if their schemes were challenged in court or found to be illegal.

Don’t be fooled by the questionable promise of funding for parks. The new park fee applies only to new construction in a small part of town which is mostly developed.

Measure Z puts an upper limit on the fee, but no lower limit. The prodeveloper initiative not only directs the City Council to set the fee, it specifically enables the City Council to change or eliminate the fee at any time–without voter input.

Measure Z establishes a crony committee to oversee whatever funds may be collected and lets the committee use those funds for “committee activities”. Who knows if anything will be left after paying for their “activities”?

The citizens’ Initiative to Require Voter Approval of Certain Development Projects gives you the right vote on the amount of open space at the Fairview Development Center, so Measure Z is unnecessary.

Don’t be fooled by this deceptive pro-developer initiative!

Vote No on Measure Z!

Learn more at costamesa1st.com.

s/ Sandra Genis Land Planner Costa Mesa City Council Member

s/ Jay Humphrey Former Costa Mesa Council Member and Vice Mayor

s/ Mary Spadoni Retired Investigator, Orange County District Attorney

s/ Wendy Leece Former Costa Mesa City Council Member Former Trustee, Newport-Mesa Unified School District

s/ Richard Huffman Treasurer, Costa Mesa First

— Orange County Registrar of Voters

Refutación al argumento A FAVOR

DON’T BE FOOLED!

Measure Z’s purpose is to stop the CITIZENS’ Initiative to Require Voter Approval of Certain Development Projects, also on this ballot. The CITIZENS’ initiative gives you the right to vote on large projects affecting your quality of life in all 15.8 square miles of Costa Mesa, not just a fraction of Fairview Developmental Center.

THIS IS A PRO DEVELOPER INITIATIVE!

Politicians and their cronies are hoping you’ll give up the right to vote on Costa Mesa’s future for the unreliable prospect of added park funding.

DECEPTIVE LANGUAGE!

Proponents of Measure Z tell you how much COULD BE USED for fields– not how much WOULD BE RAISED. It may be just a small fraction of the $1  million they say “could be used.” Future funds would trickle in over years, maybe decades, creating little real impact on park improvements.

COSTA MESANS: DON’T COMPROMISE!

Less than half the people using Costa Mesa’s athletic fields are Costa Mesa residents. Some groups have less than ten percent Costa Mesa residents. Shouldn’t some of these outsiders have to pay their fair share for using our Costa Mesa fields? That just might generate more funds than Measure Z!

ANOTHER CRONY COMMITTEE!

Measure Z could end up costing Costa Mesa taxpayers. Questionable “interfund transfers” can be used to finance activities of the crony committee while waiting for Measure Z funds to come in.

Read the fine print.

Why aren’t proponents of this deceptive initiative clearly disclosing its true purpose? Who benefits most?

Vote NO on Measure Z.

See CostaMesa1st.com

s/ Sandra Genis Land Planner Costa Mesa City Council Member

s/ Robin Leffler President, Costa Mesa Residents for Responsible Government

s/ Teresa Callo Drain Veterans’ Advocate

s/ Tom Egan Former School Board Member, Newport-Mesa Unified School District

s/ Alex Reich Software Engineer

— Orange County Registrar of Voters

Refutación al argumento EN CONTRA

The opponents of Measure Z are the same people that oppose anything in town that moves, makes a profit, provides recreation, benefits families, or enhances our quality of life.

Measure Z simply sets aside 25% of the State Developmental Hospital on Harbor Blvd. when it closes for active and passive recreation. And it requires developers to pay for it.

It’s plain, simple, and easy to comprehend. Unless you believe in UFO’s.

The Hospital is 104 acres in the middle of Costa Mesa, a perfect location for baseball diamonds, soccer and football fields, and passive walking trails. It will be the 3rd largest park in town – funded by developers building near the Costa Mesa/Santa Ana city limits.

Early estimates show developers will pay over $1 million to build this park – and a committee of citizens will determine how the money is spent.

Costa Mesa is 98% built out. Wouldn’t it be nice to carve out a little open space from one of the few remaining open parcels for our kids to play ball and families to picnic? That’s what Measure Z does, unless you believe in UFO’s.

According to the opponents, adding 25 acres of fields and trails will somehow “reduce open space and increase traffic and pollution.” That’s nuts!

The Hospital is a once in lifetime opportunity for Costa Mesa. Let’s protect for parks and open space and make the developers pay for it.

If you want the developers to pay for Costa Mesa’s 3rd Largest Park vote Yes on Measure Z.

s/ James Righeimer Mayor Pro Tem, City of Costa Mesa

s/ Lee Ramos Commissioner, Costa Mesa Senior Commission

s/ Gordon Bowley President, Costa Mesa United

s/ Bruce Skibby Regional Commissioner, AYSO Region 97

s/ Brett Eckles Chairman, Costa Mesa Parks and Recreation Commission

— Orange County Registrar of Voters
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